Go bear it to the Centaur, where we host, And stay there, Dromio, till I come to thee.... 2. II,2,406. The Comedy of Errors Shakespeare homepage | Comedy of Errors | Act 1, Scene 1 Next scene. This woman lock'd me out this day from … After both being separated from their twins in a shipwreck, Antipholus and his slave Dromio go to Ephesus to find them. 1 AEGEON: A heavier task could not have been impos'd Than I to speak my griefs unspeakable; Yet, that the world may witness that my end Was wrought by nature, not by vile offence, I'll utter what my sorrow gives me leave. The Comedy of Errors is one of William Shakespeare's early plays. OPTIONS: Show cue speeches • Show full speeches # Act, Scene, Line (Click to see in context) Speech text: 1. THE COMEDY OF ERRORS ADRIANA: Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown. The Comedy of Errors, written by William Shakespeare and first performed by 1594, largely deals with the concept of identity, from the farcical mistaken identities of twins Antipholus and Dromio, to the roles of the women around them. I,2,179. Read the monologue for the role of Courtesan from the script for The Comedy of Errors by William Shakespeare. A ring he hath of mine worth forty ducats, And for the same he promis'd me a chain: Both one and other he denies me now. ADRIANA: Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown.Some other mistress hath thy sweet aspects;I am not Adriana, nor thy wife.The time was once when thou unurged wouldst vowThat never words were music to thine ear,That never object pleasing in thine eye,That never touch well welcome to thy hand,That never meat sweet-savored in thy taste,Unless I spake, or looked, or touched, or carved to thee.How comes it now, my husband, O, how comes it,That thou art then estrangèd from thyself?Thyself I call it, being strange to me,That, undividable, incorporate,Am better than thy dear self's better part.Ah, do not tear away thyself from me!For know, my love, as easy mayst thou fallA drop of water in the breaking gulf,And take unmingled thence that drop againWithout addition of diminishing,As take from me thyself and not me too.How dearly would it touch thee to the quick,Shouldst thou but hear I were licentious,And that this body, consecrate to thee,By ruffian lust should be contaminate!Wouldst thou not spit at me, and spurn at me,And hurl the name of husband in my face,And tear the stained skin off my harlot-brow,And from my false hand cut the wedding-ring,And break it with a deep-divorcing vow?I know thou canst, and therefore see thou do it.I am possessed with an adulterate blot;My blood is mingled with the crime of lust.For if we two be one, and thou play false,I do digest the poison of thy flesh,Being strumpeted by thy contagion.Keep then fair league and truce with thy true bed;I live disdained, thou undishonorèd. Enter DUKE SOLINUS, AEGEON, Gaoler, Officers, and other Attendants AEGEON Proceed, Solinus, to procure my fall And by the doom of death end woes and all. in "Comedy of Errors" Total: 103. print/save view. I,2,171. The Comedy of Errors. I,2,182. All's Well That Ends Well Antony & Cleopatra As You Like It Comedy of Errors Coriolanus Cymbeline Double Falsehood Edward 3 Hamlet Henry 4.1 Henry 4.2 Henry 5 Henry 6.1 Henry 6.2 Henry 6.3 Henry 8 Julius Caesar King John King Lear King Richard 2 Love's Labour's Lost Macbeth Measure for Measure Merchant of Venice Merry Wives of Windsor Midsummer Night's Dream Much Ado About Nothing … A trusty villain, sir, that very oft, Thirty-three years before the play begins Aegeon, a merchant of Syracuse, became the father of twin boys. Monologues are presented on StageAgent for educational purposes only. The Comedy of Errors Act IV, sc. What answer, sir? A side-by-side No Fear translation of The Comedy of Errors Act 3 Scene 2 1 ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS: My liege, I am advised what I say: Neither disturb'd with the effect of wine, Nor heady-rash, provok'd with raging ire, Albeit my wrongs might make one wiser mad. OPTIONS: Show cue speeches • Show full speeches # Act, Scene, Line (Click to see in context) Speech text: 1. This site uses cookies to improve your experience: Contemporary Monologues from Published Plays. Adriana (Act 2, Scene 2) Luciana (Act 3, Scene 2) Courtesan (Act 4, Scene 3) Adriana (Act 5, Scene 1) Abbess (Act 5, Scene 1) Men. All rights reserved. The Comedy of Errors Summary. William Shakespeare The Comedy of Errors Act 1 sc.1 ll.31-95 All monologues are property and copyright of their owners. The Comedy of Errors Shakespeare homepage | Comedy of Errors | Entire play ACT I SCENE I. All Rights Reserved. Characters. Privacy Policy • Theatre Links. Many a man would take you at your word, And go indeed, having so good a mean. The reason that I gather he is mad, Besides this present instance of his rage, Actually understand The Comedy of Errors Act 3, Scene 2. Monologues are presented on StageAgent for educational purposes only. A hall in DUKE SOLINUS'S palace. The Comedy of Errors Act I, sc. Women. 2. A hall in DUKE SOLINUS'S palace. Aegeon and his wife were travelling home with their sons and the servants when they were shipwrecked in a violent storm. A complete database of Shakespeare's Monologues. The Comedy of Errors, Shakespeare's tale of mistaken identities, as adapted in 1976 into a modern musical form for the RSC, by Trevor Nunn. A complete database of Shakespeare's … Comic Monologues for Men • Comic Monologues for Women • Dramatic Monologues for Men • Dramatic Monologues for Women Classical Monologues for Men • Classical Monologues for Women • Monologues for Seniors • Monologues for ChildrenCopyright © 2005 - 2020 Monologue Archive. He named them both Antipholus and bought another pair of twins, both named Dromio, to be their servants. A street before a Priory. You can browse and/or search so you can find a monologue whether you know which one you want, or you're looking for monologue ideas. 3 COURTESAN: Now, out of doubt, Antipholus is mad, Else would he never so demean himself. “The play begins with Aegeon telling his story. In Syracusa was I … Some other mistress hath thy sweet aspects; I am not Adriana, nor thy wife. It’s simple language when compared to that of King Lear or Hamlet is perfect for someone wanting to try their hand with a Shakespeare monologue but isn’t ready yet for “To be or not to be”. … print/save view : Previous scene: Play menu Act V, Scene 1. Read every line of Shakespeare’s original text alongside a modern English translation. The Comedy of Errors is, along with The Tempest, one of only two Shakespearean plays to observe the Aristotelian principle of unity of time—that is, that the events of a … Luciana says: And may it be that you have quite forgot A husband's office? Making it easier to find monologues since 1997. SCENE I. 3. Gradesfixer.com The Comedy of Errors, written by William Shakespeare and first performed by 1594, largely deals with the concept of identity, from the farcical mistaken identities of twins Antipholus and Dromio, to the roles of the women around them.In an exploration of accepted gender norms, readers can easily note that the key women in the play-Adriana, Luciana, and Emilia, draw or have been conditioned … when spake I such a word? Selected monologues from The Comedy of Errors including video examples, context and character information. It is his shortest and one of his most farcical comedies, with a major part of the humour coming from slapstick and mistaken identity, in addition to puns and word play. OPTIONS: Show cue speeches • Show full speeches # Act, Scene, Line (Click to see in context) Speech text: 1. The Duke arranged for his marriage to a wealthy lady, Adriana, and he became one of the richest and best-known merchants in Ephesus, known for his honor and good credit. This is a wonderfully comedic monologue. The monologues are organized by play, then categorized by comedy, history and tragedy. The other set of twins lives in Ephesus, and the new arrivals cause a series of incidents of mistaken identity. Aegeon (Act 1, Scene 1) Duke Solinus (Act 1, Scene 1) Balthazar (Act 3, Scene 1) Antipholus (Act 5, Scene 1) The Comedy of Errors Act V, sc. in "Comedy of Errors" Total: 63. print/save view. in "Comedy of Errors" Total: 99. print/save view. William Shakespeare The Comedy of Errors Act 5 sc.1 ll.69-87 All monologues are property and copyright of their owners. [Enter Second Merchant and ANGELO] Angelo. Read the monologue for the role of Luciana from the script for The Comedy of Errors by William Shakespeare. Antipholus of Ephesus was brought up in Corinth, never knowing his father, and brought to Ephesus by Duke Menaphon of Corinth.. Duke Solinus of Ephesus, Menaphon’s nephew, became his patron, and he served worthily in his wars. Making it easier to find monologues since 1997. Comedy of Errors is one of Shakespeare’s earliest plays, perhaps the first. Enter DUKE SOLINUS, AEGEON, Gaoler, Officers, and other Attendants AEGEON Proceed, Solinus, to procure my fall And by the doom of death end woes and all. DUKE SOLINUS Character monologues from Shakespeare’s play The Comedy of Errors.